Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Google Test Automation Conference talks online

The videos of the talks from last weeks Google Test Automation Conference (gtac) in NY have been on YouTube for a few days now (you can find a playlist here or use the embeded viewer below).





I haven't had the time to watch them all yet, but i hope i'll be able to catch up soon. Many Attendees of the conference have blogged about their experience at gatc. Kumar McMillan gives a nice summary on his blog. The techtalks from last years conference were quite good, so i guess won't regret watching the new ones :-)

Sunday, August 26, 2007

Music to automate Tests by

While a colleague of mine used to listen to Ennio Morricone during the execution of a load test - i always prefered rather harsh sounds like Death Metal when i was watching my army of virtual users marching into battle ;-)

Now that i'm older and (not that much ;-)) wiser it's Prog Rock what i enjoy most as soundtrack to my daily work. I noticed this the first time when i was working on automated regression tests for a german eGovernment project (which was sadly a little bit too often featured on the german IT news site heise.de.). Albums of bands like Sieges Even and Riverside made my day during that time :-)
So, what sounds do you enjoy during your daily work as a test engineer? If someone actually is reading this blog, feel free to use the comments to this post for a reply... ;-) 

Thursday, August 23, 2007

Architectures of massive Websites

After my little Rant the other day, lets talk about something really cool. Having worked on a few load tests projects (mostly "enterprise" software like CRM and ERP), i find it quite remarkable how sites like Flickr, YouTube, Digg or LiveJournal can handle (extremely) high traffic with lots of inexpensive hardware and mostly open source software. The enterprise products on the other hand are often far away from beeing allowed to be mentioned along the word 'performance' in the same sentence ;-) (but heh, that's not too bad since it does mean more work for us load test guys :-))


I found this nice Google Techtalk about the YouTube architecture, which is really worth watching.




Another nice source for informations on the architectures of those high traffic web2.0 sites is High Scalability

Update: oh, did i mention that YouTube build their appserver in the beautiful Python language... ;-)

Monday, August 20, 2007

Nothing but Managers...

alright, it has been a while since my last posting to this blog... well, here we go after several months of absence ;)

Chris McMahon talks in the last post on his blog about something that seems to be symptomatic for our business nowadays: There are too many managers around and everyone (well, almost everyone...) wants be one of that lot. OK, getting paid like a manager certainly doesn't seem to be a bad thing ;)

On the other hand most big IT consulting companies are "struggling" from too high personnel costs (with all their managers, which are usually not that productive, since they "only" manage the productive staff). So whats their masterplan? offshore outsourcing! The "expensive" onsite staff has to become managers as well of course - instead of beeing productive as an expert in the actual doing (doing? wazzat? i know meetings, reporting and did i mention meetings? but doing... puh... dunno).

so it's only too understandable why it's getting harder to find real experts for a job instead of one of those manager guys. having that said i should add that i took (and passed :-)) the ISTQB advanced level - test management exam earlier this year (along with some colleagues @work) - with not much perspective in the doing way (remember: "experts" are hired in India nowadays) we have to play after the rules after all i guess. misa sad :-|